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The current move to reform policing across the nation, because of apparent police discrimination against minorities, took me back to my childhood contact with the “Father of Modern Policing,” recently revived in a television documentary viewed on KQED. 

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Four plus years ago I took a stab at summarizing what was happening in the presidential election campaign. At the suggestion of a staff member I am reprinting most of that column entitled “Presidential prospects,” which appeared three weeks before the election, on October 15, 2016.

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An old, obscure word, Dystopia, founded in Greek became popular in our American language during 2020, because it described how many people viewed that strange year just past.

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Our new president’s wife is probably one of the most talented and independent in history, a match for Dolly Madison, Edith Wilson, Eleanor Roosevelt and seven other top-rated  First Ladies  of unusual talents ranging from Sara Polk to Michelle Obama.

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We hear them every year, and every year we relish their sound and their sentiment. It wouldn’t be Christmas without them. So we’re repeating them (on this Champion page from Dec. 22, 1965) for your enjoyment.

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This first amendment right which is at the heart of our democratic system will always be controversial. This editorial, edited here with certain “political correctness,” first appeared in the Champion in 1967, and is enlightening today to show that the subject still involves some controversy…

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There is a false myth created by our Declaration of Independence that All Men are Created Equal. Anyone who has studied the sciences of genetics, heredity, medicine and psychology knows this is a fiction. 

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Before there were many incorporated cities filling much of the land, San Bernardino County was divided into townships, a government agency which no longer exists in California. Other states are full of them. With elected officials, townships serve much as special districts do here. Iowa has …

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Although the earliest Thanksgivings in Chino have been reported here in the past, I have had several queries about them, so here they are again.

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My feel good weekend last week was dampened by the passing of Alex Trebek, who was practically a member of the household. Particularly in recent years when he represented a return to the morality and decency for which this country has been known.

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My ballot’s in. Mailed and verified. In three more days we can get rid of those horrible repetitious TV election ads and get back to pharmaceuticals, insurance deals, souped up cars, underarm deodorant and double-talk trash. 

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Last week’s column dealt with the most talked about state measures. The rest will test your beliefs on how close to home changes in state law would come to you. In their order on the ballot:

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In a discussion with friends last week a familiar term was tossed out that I believe is misleading in its application, inferring a left-wing influence on our sources of information.

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Demonstrations that turn into riots are nothing new for this country, although they worry us still. They trace back to our Revolutionary War. Not all were disasters, and some got real results. Just ask King George III about the Boston Tea Party, the Suffragettes about their parade in March 1…

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Last week most of us got a card from the U.S. Postal Service assuring us it was safe to vote by mail in the November general election. Between the Postal Service and the White House, a lot of unease has been created about mail balloting.  Unnecessarily in California and San Bernardino county. 

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The breakdown of historic discrimination against people of Mexican background began after World War II in Richard Gird’s white-dominated community as well as others in the Los Angeles area. 

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Californians need to look for distortions in the propositions before them in the November 3 election. And be wary of misleading ads and TV commercials.  Voters should have received both sample ballots and mail ballots by now, in sufficient time to study them.

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In 1974 the Republicans appeared in disarray in the state, and a new politician, a Chino hometown boy of Mexican descent from immigrants was making a name of himself. He started as a PTA parent, won a spot on the school board, then on the Chino city council. He became the city’s first electe…

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This month marked the 50-year anniversary of a “racial” controversy in Southern California with violent acts similar to those currently taking place elsewhere in our state and country. Discrimination in crime enforcement and other areas triggered these earlier conflicts, too, then among the …

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Chino went through a cultural change in the 1960s. It didn’t come overnight, but it set the stage for a better community today. Involved was the further breaking down of the historic discrimination between the “Anglo” and Mexican-American populations, one that included separate theater seati…

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One of Chino’s versatile and outstanding citizens, Craig Watkins, died Friday, August 7, at the age of 73.  He was an educator, musician, club leader and businessman who worked with a number of local organizations, ranging from church to historical society.

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A look at Chino 50 years ago shows an emerging community of 20,000 faced with some of the same problems it has today. Of course there was no city of Chino Hills or Preserve yet but some basic issues were forming.

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There’s been a lot of water under the dam since this column was written in October 1967, and reprinted in 2008. The American Dream has not changed, it has just expanded. That water is still muddy, as current events are showing. Welfare is still an issue but a scary pandemic is changing the i…

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You’ve probably noticed some changes in your print newspapers lately. Because of the coronavirus sweeping the country (and world), the pages are down because advertising is down and so is reporting. But there is a bigger virus at work—an economic blight which puts bottom lines ahead of tradi…

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The Rolltop Roundup has taken the day off while the writer studies some major developments in the newspaper business.

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History is taking a beating, probably because of the frustrations brought on by the coronavirus, the pending national election, and specifically the action of a rogue cop in Minneapolis and others like him. Probably all three, and if not them then something else waiting to upset our apple ca…

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The Fourth of July is a good time to focus on a topic important to our country’s functioning which has become obscured by our attention to the coronavirus and Black Lives Matter.

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Fifty years ago our nation experienced a huge demonstration that had a lasting effect, and peacefully. It’s often left out of the lists of uprisings carried by the media in relation to the current demonstrations that have left some people and property battered and the cops in the frying pan.…

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Does your daughter go to school with the knees of her jeans torn out? Is your son sporting visible tattoos to his wrists? Does their teacher wear a shirt with a slogan or advertisement  on it? Time to run a Roundup that first ran in May 1967 and was reprinted 12 years ago in 2008, just to le…

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Last Sunday one of the country’s most interesting actor-directors joined the fairly exclusive club of nonagenarians, of which I am a member. In fact, I beat him by almost 10 months.

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Last week I had so much fun cleaning out my pent up Rolltop Roundup files that I thought I would keep going. Here are some more:

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“History explains why things are the way they are today.”

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If ever there was a need for patience, it is now, during this coronavirus thing.

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Back in 1970, I reprinted an item by one of Chino's most well-known part-time residents, a prominent TV personality, who told the world why he liked the community. My Roundup of June 17, 1970 read:

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The battered book is labeled “The New Civics,” and I’ve forgotten where I picked it up. But I must have been attracted by the label pasted on the cover which said “1919.”

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Earlier this month during the Rest In Place to keep coronavirus from spreading, my apartment complex aired the comedy “Going in Style,” in which seniors Alan Arkin, Morgan Freeman and Michael Caine play a trio of retirees who rob a bank in revenge for having their retirement pay being cut off.  

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This past week some important dates were overlooked by media and officials soaked in coverage of the coronavirus pandemic. These historic milestones remind us of the importance of solid leadership when our country needs it the most.

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Early water saver--W.H. Snyder, the pioneer businessman who started a bakery in Chino on Seventh Street, then built the building at Sixth and D which was to house Reher’s Drug Store and Mr. Snyder’s moved bakery, gave Chino its first lawn sprinkling system, according to the Sept. 17, 1913 Champion.

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It seems like the world is shutting down, well out of proportion to the threat, at least here in the good old USA. Thanks to Gabby Gavin, our preening governor who couldn’t relinquish the spotlight even to take a breath in his politician-pastor discourse early in the week,  California senior…

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San Francisco and six Bay Area counties, with a combined population of nearly 7 million, are under “shelter-in-place” orders directing everyone to basically stay inside their homes for the next three weeks in hopes of suppressing the rapid spread of COVID-19 across the region.

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Five years ago today, the Rolltop contained the following before the last presidential election. Things have changed as they always do, but from a history standpoint the thinking of the late Will and Ariel Durant may help some readers cope with today’s happenings, so here it is again. CAUTIO…

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(Last Monday was Read Across America Day--honoring the birthday of Theodor Seuss (Ted) Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss. Educators promote the day to emphasize motivation and awareness of reading. I'm happy to see that some of my own childhood books remain high on the popularity list, as li…