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There’s been a lot of water under the dam since this column was written in October 1967, and reprinted in 2008. The American Dream has not changed, it has just expanded. That water is still muddy, as current events are showing. Welfare is still an issue but a scary pandemic is changing the i…

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You’ve probably noticed some changes in your print newspapers lately. Because of the coronavirus sweeping the country (and world), the pages are down because advertising is down and so is reporting. But there is a bigger virus at work—an economic blight which puts bottom lines ahead of tradi…

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The Rolltop Roundup has taken the day off while the writer studies some major developments in the newspaper business.

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History is taking a beating, probably because of the frustrations brought on by the coronavirus, the pending national election, and specifically the action of a rogue cop in Minneapolis and others like him. Probably all three, and if not them then something else waiting to upset our apple ca…

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The Fourth of July is a good time to focus on a topic important to our country’s functioning which has become obscured by our attention to the coronavirus and Black Lives Matter.

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Fifty years ago our nation experienced a huge demonstration that had a lasting effect, and peacefully. It’s often left out of the lists of uprisings carried by the media in relation to the current demonstrations that have left some people and property battered and the cops in the frying pan.…

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Does your daughter go to school with the knees of her jeans torn out? Is your son sporting visible tattoos to his wrists? Does their teacher wear a shirt with a slogan or advertisement  on it? Time to run a Roundup that first ran in May 1967 and was reprinted 12 years ago in 2008, just to le…

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Last Sunday one of the country’s most interesting actor-directors joined the fairly exclusive club of nonagenarians, of which I am a member. In fact, I beat him by almost 10 months.

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Last week I had so much fun cleaning out my pent up Rolltop Roundup files that I thought I would keep going. Here are some more:

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“History explains why things are the way they are today.”

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If ever there was a need for patience, it is now, during this coronavirus thing.

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Back in 1970, I reprinted an item by one of Chino's most well-known part-time residents, a prominent TV personality, who told the world why he liked the community. My Roundup of June 17, 1970 read:

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The battered book is labeled “The New Civics,” and I’ve forgotten where I picked it up. But I must have been attracted by the label pasted on the cover which said “1919.”

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Earlier this month during the Rest In Place to keep coronavirus from spreading, my apartment complex aired the comedy “Going in Style,” in which seniors Alan Arkin, Morgan Freeman and Michael Caine play a trio of retirees who rob a bank in revenge for having their retirement pay being cut off.  

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This past week some important dates were overlooked by media and officials soaked in coverage of the coronavirus pandemic. These historic milestones remind us of the importance of solid leadership when our country needs it the most.

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Early water saver--W.H. Snyder, the pioneer businessman who started a bakery in Chino on Seventh Street, then built the building at Sixth and D which was to house Reher’s Drug Store and Mr. Snyder’s moved bakery, gave Chino its first lawn sprinkling system, according to the Sept. 17, 1913 Champion.

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It seems like the world is shutting down, well out of proportion to the threat, at least here in the good old USA. Thanks to Gabby Gavin, our preening governor who couldn’t relinquish the spotlight even to take a breath in his politician-pastor discourse early in the week,  California senior…

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San Francisco and six Bay Area counties, with a combined population of nearly 7 million, are under “shelter-in-place” orders directing everyone to basically stay inside their homes for the next three weeks in hopes of suppressing the rapid spread of COVID-19 across the region.

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Five years ago today, the Rolltop contained the following before the last presidential election. Things have changed as they always do, but from a history standpoint the thinking of the late Will and Ariel Durant may help some readers cope with today’s happenings, so here it is again. CAUTIO…

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(Last Monday was Read Across America Day--honoring the birthday of Theodor Seuss (Ted) Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss. Educators promote the day to emphasize motivation and awareness of reading. I'm happy to see that some of my own childhood books remain high on the popularity list, as li…

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Today, Leap Day, and Leap Year in general, are part of a truly confused time system that humans have failed to conquer. Today being a non-working day for most, perhaps we should spend it reflecting on how we could do a better job.

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A breath of fresh air from Sacramento blew into Chino last week when State Treasurer Fiona Ma appeared at the Chamber of Commerce Pizza and Politics lunch at the Community Building on Thursday to tout the CalSavers Retirement Savings program. 

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If you think the Iowa caucus election was confusing, try the March 3 California Primary for size. Other than party elections that have different rules about who can vote in them, the most confusing part is the lone statewide ballot measure, unfortunately labeled Proposition 13, which is a bi…

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From the title this sounds like a Valentine’s Day tribute, but it’s actually a Rolltop Roundup from almost 50 years ago, Oct. 21, 1970 and reprinted in 2013, and here again with some notes added in italics. Hopefully it will put present day woes in perspective.  

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Tomorrow, eyes will be centered on the Super Bowl’s handling of the National Anthem. Aside from the World Series and the Olympics award presentations, the singing of our patriotic hymn will have its foremost sports world audience Sunday. Hopefully, no one will take advantage of it to ruin ou…

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David Allen, the popular columnist in the Daily Bulletin who is trying to hold its readership together as its staff becomes decimated, must have been reading my mind, or at least we sometimes think alike. He beat me to a column about his book reading. I’d been saving up for one on the same s…

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Terry Francke, the state’s open government guru whose Californians Aware has alerted the public to secrecy misdeeds, and who was a key player in updating the Brown Act  and Public Records Act, retired January 1 after decades of work on behalf of citizens concerned about openness. However, hi…

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There are two pint-sized jugs of Chino Cider at the Old Schoolhouse Museum which once contained one of the community’s finest product. The pure apple cider harked back to the days when Chino Valley somewhat rivaled Oak Glen in the production of apples. It was after the turn of the 20th Centu…

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I couldn’t have guessed 25 years ago that I’d see the year 2020. Now it’s pure hindsight.

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Helen was pleased that Robert had liked the coat. She had been ashamed to give him something used for Christmas, but he needed a coat badly, and there wasn’t enough money to buy him a new one. This one looked like leather, although it was a tan polyvinyl. You don’t find those on the racks at…

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The celebration of Pearl Harbor Day last week focused on the few survivors remaining from this “day of infamy” that launched us into World War II. Hopefully by Dec. 7, 2020, we will have made the effort to prevent another one, if it isn’t too late.

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It’s pretty hard in this day of instant communications to keep a stiff upper lip. In the old days before social media people had all night or more to digest bad news. Or in even older days, until the next Extra! hit the streets. Now people have 30 minutes to absorb the world’s problems they …

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It's a big job taking charge of the family Thanksgiving, but as children reminded us in essays the Champion solicited from fifth graders (see the one below), it's fun when everyone brings their special holiday dish to share. Many hands make for lighter work.  

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It was about 45 years ago that the Champion started taking electronic computers seriously. I say electronic, because we had already gotten into mechanical ones to replace metal typesetting. This was back in the days before ITs, Wi-Fi, apps,  algorithms and artificial intelligence were part o…

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Part of Chino’s past was for the birds—in a way that would be approved to some extent by today’s environmentalists. The birds were pheasants, geese, wild turkeys, partridges and quail. The valley was loaded with them, raised here by the state for wildlife preservation and recreation purposes.

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November 11 is a significant day for us at the Champion. We’ll be honoring veterans like almost everyone else on Veterans Day, known as Armistice Day until 1954. It had been established in 1919 under President Wilson to recognize the end of the War to End All Wars, at the 11th hour of the 11…

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I chatted with a couple of guys last week who felt the world, with all its problems, may soon be coming to an end. Since this does not fit in with my philosophy, I argued that people have been saying that for generations, and we’re still here.

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Summer turned into fall with many items needing cleaning up on my desk. I miss my old rolltop, which expired in our fire of 1971 and whose memory is the basis of the name of this column. Back then I would just shut down the cover of the desk and keep my office looking nice. 

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There’s a lot of stress on stress these days. The AARP publications, Consumer Reports and a raft of medically-oriented magazines are filling their pages with this supposedly life-shortening “disease.”

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Carbon Canyon summit blossomed with iris in 1929 when a big picnic celebration was held to observe the opening of Carbon Canyon Road to general traffic between Chino and Brea in Orange County.

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One of the most important observances in our history slipped by this past week with little notice, partly because of the 9/11 focus. September 17 is made more important by the fact that 9/11 didn’t bury us, any more than did other terrible events in our history, including 4/12 (1861), 12/7 (…

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Carbon Canyon is such a wonderful part of our area, I thought I would draw on a September 2013 Roundup to inform relative newcomers and remind older residents of Chino Valley about this local asset. In weeks ahead, while Canyon historian Paul Spitzzeri wanders elsewhere, I hope to relate som…

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It’s pretty hard these days to get your hand on  a gold dollar. Forty years ago the government gave it a try with the Susie in an effort to spotlight women’s rights. Later came the Sacajawea, to call attention to Native American (and again, women in history). Neither took hold for long.  Ban…

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Schools, parents and interested public, who have been wrestling with the state law on teaching sex education, face another brain-buster—the push for ethnic studies.